How to get rid of the mustache that can cause migraines

If you’ve ever had a migraine, you may be wondering how to rid your brain of the irritating beard that can sometimes cause it.

But a new study by researchers at the University of Arizona and the Mayo Clinic in Arizona shows a quick, inexpensive and effective way of removing the facial hair.

Their study, published in the journal Neurology, found that removing the mustache could help reduce symptoms of migrainous headaches and even improve overall mood.

“There are some people that have no problems with the facial growth, but it can also trigger a headache,” said Dr Helen Latham, the study’s lead author.

“Some people may have problems with headaches because of other conditions that can be associated with facial growth.”

“For many people, they’re going to be better off if they get rid [of the mustache] and just use an anti-inflammatory medication, but we found that [it] has a number of other benefits as well.”

Dr Latham said the research showed that the facial removal process could be used to treat migraine sufferers.

“People that suffer from migrainic headaches, it’s often due to the inflammation and the swelling that they’re getting in their head,” she said.

“If you’re able to reduce the inflammation, that could be a great solution.”

Dr Paul Whelan, who was not involved in the study, said removing facial hair was a relatively common procedure.

“It’s not like cutting the hair out and it’s not going to make it go away, but removing it can be a pretty effective way to remove facial hair, as well,” he said.

He said removing the hair could be done in the same way that removing a wig was.

“You don’t have to take it out completely, it just needs to go,” Dr Whelin said.

The Mayo Clinic also conducted a study last year that found facial hair removal could help prevent migrainitis.

“Our study shows that removing facial follicles from a person with migraina is a relatively simple procedure that can reduce symptoms, and it has a variety of health benefits,” Dr Jana Eriksen, the Mayo clinic’s associate clinical professor of dermatology, said in a statement.

“In addition to alleviating symptoms, the procedure also may reduce the risk of developing migrainae in the future.”

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