What Ryan Seacrest Has to Say About All the Coolness and Coolnessness News

Bryan Seacres health has been a constant topic of conversation for weeks.

A recent article in Bleacherreport noted that Seacreten, who has been battling prostate cancer for years, said he was currently being treated with an anti-inflammatory drug called ketamine.

“It’s good for me,” he told Bleacher.

“I’m doing pretty well.”

It’s a bit of a weird line of questioning for a sport that regularly makes fun of its fans for being on the fence about what to wear, how much to eat, or even how much time to devote to it. 

While the NFL does not provide any statistics for how many fans take ketamine and the drug is still considered controversial in sports medicine circles, a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found that people who take the drug report a greater reduction in anxiety and depression than non-users.

While that study was limited in its scope, it does appear to suggest that people taking ketamine for pain relief and depression can be more effective than people who are not taking the drug.

“People with depression and anxiety who are on ketamine have fewer adverse events and fewer serious adverse events than nonusers,” study co-author Dr. James L. Zukin, an assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University, said in a press release. 

“If you think about it, the most common side effects of ketamine are sleep disturbances and anxiety.

And people who use ketamine, like most people, don’t necessarily think about that as a concern,” Dr. Zuckin added. 

In other words, people who consume ketamine don’t seem to think about their negative side effects as something that could potentially impact their performance or the team’s success. 

But a recent article by the New York Times published on Monday suggests that a common perception of ketamines positive effects on depression is misplaced.

The article states that doctors in New York City have begun prescribing the drug to people who suffer from depression. 

However, this report does not address the fact that ketamine can also help those who have been suffering from anxiety and insomnia as well. 

According to Dr. Dr. William D. Smith, a clinical professor of psychiatry at NYU Langone Medical Center and one of the authors of the study, ketamine has been shown to improve symptoms of depression in patients with anxiety disorders and depression.

The treatment works by “sensitizing the brain to the stressor and then stimulating the reward pathways,” he said. 

And when people who have anxiety and mood disorders are on a drug like ketamine they are less likely to develop anxiety and other negative symptoms, he said in an interview with BleacherReport. 

For more from The MMQB, check out our new video podcast, The Inside NFL, which premieres on Tuesday, January 10 at 11:00 a.m.

ET/PT on BleacherNation.