Which of the GOP’s ‘out of control’ health-care bills will pass?

The Trump administration has a list of bills to be signed into law in the coming weeks that would dramatically expand the number of Americans insured.

The House of Representatives and Senate have yet to decide on a measure that would allow insurers to charge more for people with pre-existing conditions and increase the cost of coverage for people who do not have health insurance.

In a letter obtained by CNN, the House Ways and Means Committee is expected to begin reviewing two bills Thursday that would make it easier for insurers to sell plans across state lines, including in states where Obamacare remains law.

Under the Senate bill, states that allow plans in their individual insurance markets would be allowed to offer plans in those markets.

States that have refused to participate in the individual market would be required to participate, and those states would not be allowed, to charge a more generous premium than insurers in the rest of the country.

The Senate bill would also allow insurers that have more than 5% of their business in the insurance market to charge extra for people whose premiums are too high.

A second measure that the House will consider Thursday would allow states to waive the individual mandate that requires them to cover people with preexisting conditions.

The administration also wants to give states more leeway in how they allocate health spending.

Under current law, states get a fixed amount of money each year from the federal government to set aside for programs like Medicaid.

The Trump White House is proposing to give the states more control over how much they allocate.

The bills are also expected to give Congress the power to raise taxes, by providing money for tax cuts that are offset by reductions in Medicare and Medicaid spending.

The two bills are expected to be debated by the House and Senate, which have been at odds over how to fix the nation’s broken health care system.

The White House, which has pushed to eliminate or substantially modify Obamacare, said the bills are “out of touch with the American people.”

“Republicans should stop wasting their time debating and passing their failed, failed healthcare bill, and start fixing the problems that are plaguing America right now,” Trump said in a statement Thursday.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, a Republican from Wisconsin, said in an interview Thursday that the bills would not solve the country’s problems.

“They’re not going to solve the problem of our broken health-insurance system, which is the most expensive in the world,” Ryan said.

The health-reform legislation has been met with criticism from Republicans who want to maintain insurance coverage.

“There are some good provisions in the bill, but I’m concerned about how they’re structured and how they might actually drive up premiums,” said Rep. Tim Huelskamp, R-Kan.

“If premiums rise because of the law, I don’t think they should be blamed for that.”

Ryan said the administration is working with congressional leaders to draft a bipartisan bill that would give states the flexibility to set their own standards for covering pre-elderly adults and their families.

“The president and I are working to make sure that this bill does not increase the number or severity of people who lose coverage,” Ryan told CNN.

The Republican bill also would allow employers with more than 50 workers to opt out of providing coverage to people with high-cost or high-risk pre-conditioning conditions, or who are disabled or who have serious health problems.

The plan also would require insurers to offer policies with lower premiums and to cover preventive care at no cost to the insurer.

The Affordable Care Act also required employers to provide coverage for at least 60 days to workers who had been laid off or had been injured and who had a preexistent condition.

The law also required insurers to cover pregnancy, newborn, and pediatric care.