Which is best for women who have EBV: A study or a traditional herbal medicine

The study, published in the journal Acta Anaesthesiology, found that the traditional herbal medicines used by women with EBV were equally effective in treating the symptoms and treating the infection.

But it also said that there were concerns about whether traditional herbs were better at treating the EBV than the newer medicines. 

The researchers, from the University of Copenhagen and the University Hospital of Copenhagen, analyzed data from 4,000 women from Denmark, Norway and Finland.

They also interviewed more than 1,000 volunteers.

They found that women with more EBV symptoms had a higher incidence of complications than women with milder symptoms, the researchers said.

The authors said that they wanted to understand whether there were differences in the outcomes of traditional and modern herbal medicine among women with different symptoms and infections.

“The most common findings are that there are no significant differences between traditional and newer herbal medicines, except in a small subgroup of women with acute and severe disease,” the researchers wrote.

“There are also no differences in efficacy between traditional herbal treatments and newer, non-traditional treatments.” 

However, they found some differences in how women responded to herbal medicines.

For example, the study found that people who received herbal treatments had higher rates of adherence to the herbal medicines compared to those who received the traditional medicines.

They noted that adherence rates could be influenced by factors such as the quality of the herbal treatment, and whether or not the herbal medicine was used in combination with the traditional medicine.

The researchers said that while there were no clear answers to why women respond differently to herbal treatments, they said the findings suggest there may be differences in treatment effectiveness between traditional, nonconventional and traditional herbal treatment.

“We also found that in women with severe EBV, the traditional therapies seem to be more effective than the non-treatments,” the authors wrote.

“This suggests that the herbal treatments may have been more effective for some women.”

The study did not address whether the traditional herbs used by these women differed from newer, more effective traditional treatments.

However, the authors pointed out that the differences were likely to be smaller than the differences between modern and traditional medicine in the prevention and treatment of EBV. 

However they did say that the results may not be generalizable to all women who were using herbal medicines in the past. 

“We don’t know if the findings apply to women in general, and we also don’t yet know how these findings may translate into women who are currently using herbal treatments,” the study authors wrote in their paper.