How to buy an insurance plan for birth control in the United States

A new policy on contraception, which takes effect in July, could put a dent in the $100 billion a year that women pay for contraception, according to a study by the Guttmacher Institute and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

The new policy requires insurers to cover the cost of birth control for women ages 17 and up, even if they don’t have employer-sponsored insurance or Medicaid coverage.

That could lead to a major savings for many women.

The report, released Wednesday, comes after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that women who want to get birth control must have employer coverage.

It could affect how much women can save for contraception and other medical expenses.

The Guttms report, which focuses on birth control coverage in the Affordable Care Act, found that women in the lowest-income families, who typically make up the most of the population, pay more than $6,500 in out-of-pocket costs for contraceptives each year.

The number of women using birth control is rising dramatically.

In 2013, there were about 12.5 million births, according a study published by the National Women’s Law Center in March.

In 2016, the number was up to 18.5.

The number of births in the U, U.K. and Australia increased by an average of 4.3% between 2014 and 2016.

The authors of the study estimate that, in 2019, the total cost of contraception would increase by more than 3.5 trillion dollars in out of pocket expenses, or about $1,800 per woman.

The study says it’s possible that some people might use the policy to get out of paying for contraception for an emergency.

But, it said, it’s likely that these women will continue to use birth control because they want to.

The policy, called the Family Planning Contraception Coverage Rule, requires insurance companies to provide contraception coverage for all women in their health plans.

Women will be able to buy insurance with this coverage, provided it doesn’t cover birth control, or pay the full cost.

If they don�t have employer plans or Medicaid, they�ll have to pay part of the cost.

That means if a woman is on a family plan and her employer doesn�t cover birth-control, she will have to buy it for herself.

The researchers say women will also be able access coverage if they choose to, even though the law requires insurers not to cover contraception for anyone under the age of 30.

The authors say that could be a significant benefit for young women.

They�ve also estimated that women could save about $2,000 per year if they can buy the coverage with an employer-subsidized insurance policy.

This could save the women an average $2.65 per month on their health insurance premiums.

This would amount to an average savings of more than 6% per year on their insurance premiums, and the report also notes that it would cost women an additional $3,300 annually in the long run.

The rule also allows insurers to charge women higher premiums if they are pregnant.

In the case of pregnancy, the insurance company will be required to refund the difference.

The cost of the refund would be about $500 a year.

If a woman uses contraception to prevent pregnancy, but doesn�trick the system to cover it, her insurance company would still pay the cost, but the refund wouldn�t be refunded, according the report.

This would reduce the cost for her and her insurance carrier by about 2%.

The authors suggest that women considering buying birth control may be tempted to pay a higher premium, but would be better off for having the policy because it�s a good deal.

Women who have no other choice but to have contraception would still be able purchase it without paying the full amount.

This is because birth control insurance companies would not be required by law to cover coverage.

The insurance companies also will have the option of covering a woman with pre-existing conditions, such as diabetes or high cholesterol.

If you have questions about the report, read more about the impact of the policy on women.

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