Health workers face pay squeeze as hospitals slash costs

Health workers have been hit hard by the cutbacks at many major hospitals as they struggle to make ends meet, with some hospitals reducing their pay.

More to follow. 

A number of hospitals have already been axing health and social care staff and the Government has promised further cuts in other areas.

The health and care secretary, Nicky Morgan, said cuts in some areas were due to the “vast scale” of cuts.

It’s not been the sort of year that you could be expecting to see cuts.””

It’s been a great shock.

It’s not been the sort of year that you could be expecting to see cuts.”

There is also a great deal of pressure on hospital trusts to reduce their bills and they have to do that, but the reality is that it’s a massive strain.

“She said hospitals had “huge challenges” in getting on top of the growing pressure, including the cost of keeping a staff. 

She said the Government had made a commitment to reducing hospital costs but that hospitals had not yet been able to do so.

In recent years, the NHS has been hit by a series of funding cuts and other pressures, which have resulted in hospitals facing severe budget constraints.

Mr Morgan said the new Government had taken “unprecedented” action to tackle the “urgent need” to cut the NHS budget.

He said: “The health service is the backbone of our economy and is a vital part of every family in this country.”

We are committed to delivering a sustainable and effective health service that meets the needs of the people of this country, and we are going to make that work for us.”

In my brief time as health secretary I have already delivered a record number of health services for the NHS and I have also reduced costs, which is what we need.

I have cut costs by a record £1.1bn by 2019-20.

“The Government has announced that the total NHS budget will be cut by £1bn this financial year, but that is not enough to reverse the decline in the number of people needing treatment.

According to figures from the Health Service Executive, NHS budgets have been cut by an average of 3.5% a year since 2009-10, when they were £3.8bn. 

However, there is still a lot of money available for NHS trusts to spend on health care, and the Department for Health says that by 2019, the average annual NHS budget would be £9.8 billion.