When the Health Care Costs Are So High, Why Is It Still So Cheap?

Oklahomans have spent nearly $200 billion in health care over the past 25 years, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

But we can’t afford all of it.

The cost of health care has soared, particularly among older Americans, according a new report from the University of Oklahoma.

Here’s why:Oklahoma health care spending is the highest in the nation and the most expensive, according the University’s Center for Health Policy and Research.

The state spends nearly twice as much on health care for its elderly as it does for its working-age population.

But Oklahoman health care costs are on the rise.

Oklahoms spend nearly $30,000 a year more on health insurance than they did in 1980, according, according research by the Oklahoma Budget and Policy Center.

The study estimates that the cost of paying for care for Oklahamans over 65 has climbed more than four times since 1980.

The increase in costs is the result of a number of factors, including the growth of Medicare, Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act.

But for Oklahoma, it’s not just seniors who are struggling to afford care.

The health care industry is suffering, too.

The industry is worth nearly $70 billion in Oklahoma.

And, thanks to the Affordable Health Care Act, there’s been a $2 billion drop in the cost to care for a baby in the state.

The study estimates the state has the third highest share of uninsured adults in the country, behind California and New York.

Oklahoma has one of the highest health care expenditures per capita in the U, which has meant higher costs for residents.

But the costs of health are a growing problem, according health policy experts.

The University’s study found that in 2019, health care expenses rose more than 10 percent in Oklahoma compared to the previous year.

And that was partly due to the ACA’s expansion of Medicaid, which covers the poor and disabled.

The Oklahoma Budget & Policy Center says the ACA expansion has helped reduce costs, but it has also meant that more people are not insured and that premiums have increased.

Okla.

has been one of 10 states that are among the top 10 states with the highest premiums in the United States.

That means some residents are paying more than $2,500 more a year than they were before the ACA expanded Medicaid.

The ACA has allowed many Oklahomonas to save for retirement, but many people are struggling financially.

There are also more Oklahomenas on Medicaid than in 2010, and many Oklaomans are worried that they may not be able to afford to care them after they reach age 65.

But the health care market isn’t all bad.

For example, Medicaid, for the first time, covers more low-income Oklahomers than high-income ones.

The Affordable Care ACT also makes it easier for Okla.-ers to enroll in private health insurance.

That could help ease the pressure on Medicaid enrollment.

The Oklahomians aren’t alone.

Health care is also an important part of Oklahomaans life.

In 2018, the state received $12.9 billion in federal health funding.

But health care also makes up about $4.9 trillion of that total.

It’s estimated that more than half of all Oklahomas health care is for chronic conditions.