Michigan woman wins $150K in Medicaid dispute

A Michigan woman has won $150,000 after her insurer failed to cover her medically necessary surgery, which was the first such operation she had in her life.

Lisa Schumann, 56, of Grand Rapids, was told her insurance plan would cover her surgery for free, but after her surgery on Oct. 5, it did not.

“I had an MRI and CT scan on my brain that were done on my birthday and it was a life-changing experience for me,” Schumann said.

“It really changed my life.

I’m not even sure what else I could have done.”

The woman, who works in a nursing home, is seeking $25,000 in damages for the $20,000 cost of the surgery.

The hospital did not return calls for comment.

The Michigan Health Insurance Plan, which Schumann was on, issued a statement saying it “will continue to be transparent about our coverage” and that the case “should have been handled differently.”

Schumann’s insurer, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield, is one of more than 500 health plans in the state that cover a wide range of medical services.

Anthem has faced complaints in the past about its coverage of the procedure, and some members of Congress have called on the company to provide coverage to all Americans.

Anthem declined to comment on the case.

Schumann filed a lawsuit against Anthem and the Michigan Health Plan in April 2018, accusing the two of discriminating against her.

She argued that her employer did not provide coverage for her procedure because it was not covered by her employer-sponsored health plan.

She also said the insurance company had violated the Affordable Care Act, which states that people who cannot afford insurance must get it through work.

Anthem did not respond to a request for comment at the time.

The insurer said in a statement that it was reviewing the case and would have no further comment.

Children’s health Defense to sue Arizona over Medicaid expansion

Children’s Health Defense attorneys have filed a lawsuit in Arizona challenging the state’s expansion of Medicaid to children, alleging the expansion is unconstitutional.

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Phoenix on Monday, alleges Arizona has not provided adequate information about the expansion and that the state is violating federal law and its own public health directives.

The federal lawsuit was filed after the state of Arizona enacted a Medicaid expansion on Jan. 1, which will cover an additional 2.6 million people and cost $10 billion to implement.

It also includes a request for an injunction to prevent Arizona from expanding Medicaid.

“Arizona is violating its own federal public health law and is blatantly violating its obligations to its residents by allowing millions of adults with disabilities to receive a financial benefit that exceeds the cost of providing their health insurance coverage,” said Chris Cagle, an attorney for Children’s Defense Fund.

“It is clear that the Governor’s office and the legislature are intent on moving the goalposts by creating a benefit for the elderly and disabled.”

The lawsuit claims the expansion would result in an increase in Medicaid coverage for children, the elderly, the disabled and the underinsured.

The expansion is a major piece of President Donald Trump’s health care agenda, which aims to expand Medicaid coverage to more than 20 million low-income adults.

Arizona has said the expansion will help offset the cost to cover low- and moderate-income people, who are more likely to have health insurance.

The state is required by law to give at least 10 months notice before expanding Medicaid coverage, and it will begin covering Medicaid residents on Jan 30, 2019.

In the lawsuit, Cagle said the Arizona expansion is “unconstitutionally discriminatory” and violates the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Children’s Defence Fund is seeking unspecified damages in the lawsuit.

Childrens Defense Fund is an Arizona-based nonprofit health care advocacy group that focuses on children’s health.

The group is based in Tucson and works to ensure that families are treated with dignity and respect, and that all children have access to quality health care.