Michigan woman wins $150K in Medicaid dispute

A Michigan woman has won $150,000 after her insurer failed to cover her medically necessary surgery, which was the first such operation she had in her life.

Lisa Schumann, 56, of Grand Rapids, was told her insurance plan would cover her surgery for free, but after her surgery on Oct. 5, it did not.

“I had an MRI and CT scan on my brain that were done on my birthday and it was a life-changing experience for me,” Schumann said.

“It really changed my life.

I’m not even sure what else I could have done.”

The woman, who works in a nursing home, is seeking $25,000 in damages for the $20,000 cost of the surgery.

The hospital did not return calls for comment.

The Michigan Health Insurance Plan, which Schumann was on, issued a statement saying it “will continue to be transparent about our coverage” and that the case “should have been handled differently.”

Schumann’s insurer, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield, is one of more than 500 health plans in the state that cover a wide range of medical services.

Anthem has faced complaints in the past about its coverage of the procedure, and some members of Congress have called on the company to provide coverage to all Americans.

Anthem declined to comment on the case.

Schumann filed a lawsuit against Anthem and the Michigan Health Plan in April 2018, accusing the two of discriminating against her.

She argued that her employer did not provide coverage for her procedure because it was not covered by her employer-sponsored health plan.

She also said the insurance company had violated the Affordable Care Act, which states that people who cannot afford insurance must get it through work.

Anthem did not respond to a request for comment at the time.

The insurer said in a statement that it was reviewing the case and would have no further comment.

How to save $2.2 billion in Oregon health care costs by 2024

Encompassing a broad range of services, Oregon Health Plan’s Oregon Health Dignity Health Jobs program will save the state $2,218 per enrollee and $4,922 per employee per year, according to the plan’s website.

The program is aimed at creating jobs in the state’s health care industry and will also provide up to $1,000 in health savings for each Oregon resident.

“We are thrilled to be able to partner with the state of Oregon and work with our Oregon Health Health Plan partners to create new jobs and opportunities for Oregonians,” said Rachel LeBoeuf, president and CEO of Oregon Health.

“Oregon Health Dignities has the potential to grow to a national model that will help us to attract and retain talented, talented, and caring individuals.”

The Oregon Health Plans annual budget is $5.4 billion.

It includes $1.8 billion in additional funding for Medicaid and $3.4 million in new funding for mental health services.

The health plan plans to announce additional jobs and job growth opportunities throughout the year.

For more information on the program, visit www.oahp.gov/healthjobs.

How to save a life by putting dignity ahead of health

Health care workers in many of the world’s poorest countries are struggling with chronic illnesses, such as chronic pain and high blood pressure, and have been at a disadvantage to those in wealthier countries.

The United States has been one of the most innovative countries in the world to help these workers, and it has been a pioneer in the use of universal health care.

The new research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that it is possible to help people to improve their health through education and health-care technology.

The researchers examined a large database of health records of more than 25 million people in more than 100 countries.

They looked at what kinds of health care interventions were used and how they improved people’s health.

The analysis showed that universal health coverage was associated with improvements in a range of health indicators, including mortality and morbidity.

The results show that health care workers can improve the quality of life in these countries.

“Our findings are of particular relevance to the poor and vulnerable,” said study co-author Dr. Jodie E. Hensley, a professor of health policy at the University of Southern California and director of the Institute for Global Health Policy at USC.

“The universal health system is important for helping people who need access to health care and are vulnerable to diseases and infections, including those with a high prevalence of chronic conditions.”

The research was based on a systematic review of health data from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

It was funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

It was published online May 16, 2017.

To learn more about the study, visit the new article on Engadge.