How to save a life by putting dignity ahead of health

Health care workers in many of the world’s poorest countries are struggling with chronic illnesses, such as chronic pain and high blood pressure, and have been at a disadvantage to those in wealthier countries.

The United States has been one of the most innovative countries in the world to help these workers, and it has been a pioneer in the use of universal health care.

The new research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that it is possible to help people to improve their health through education and health-care technology.

The researchers examined a large database of health records of more than 25 million people in more than 100 countries.

They looked at what kinds of health care interventions were used and how they improved people’s health.

The analysis showed that universal health coverage was associated with improvements in a range of health indicators, including mortality and morbidity.

The results show that health care workers can improve the quality of life in these countries.

“Our findings are of particular relevance to the poor and vulnerable,” said study co-author Dr. Jodie E. Hensley, a professor of health policy at the University of Southern California and director of the Institute for Global Health Policy at USC.

“The universal health system is important for helping people who need access to health care and are vulnerable to diseases and infections, including those with a high prevalence of chronic conditions.”

The research was based on a systematic review of health data from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

It was funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

It was published online May 16, 2017.

To learn more about the study, visit the new article on Engadge.